Poverty and Hope Appeal

Poverty and Hope Appeal

The Diocese of Rochester Poverty and Hope Appeal is our annual fundraising opportunity to express our Christian belief in justice for the poor.

 

For four decades, The Poverty and Hope Appeal has allowed us to play our part in tackling the causes and effects of poverty in different parts of the world.

In 2021, through the generosity of churches and individuals, over £20,000 was raised for the Appeal’s chosen projects. Thank you!

This year we are supporting

  • people living in the slums of Brazil
  • children's education in rural Myanmar
  • left behind minorities in Bangladesh

To these, we are adding exciting projects in three of our companion dioceses; providing clean water in Kondoa and girls' education in Mpwapwa, both in Tanzania,  and beekeeping and fish farming in Harare, Zimbabwe.

Every gift you make will go to these initiatives relieving poverty and the fear that stalks it.
 

DONATE ONLINE NOW

 

Bishop Simon invites us to support this year's appeal. Watch this short film:


This year's projects

Since the Poverty and Hope Appeal was first launched 45 years ago, it has worked in partnership with three major Christian charities to provide bridges between donors in Rochester and those living in some of poorest countries of the world. 

Today we continue to stand together with Christian Aid, USPG and CMS, who in turn link us with trusted and experienced local partners who best understand the needs of the communities in which they work.


Minority Communities in Bangladesh (Christian Aid)


Eleven per cent of the population of Bangladesh belongs to a minority community and is under-represented in government. The ‘Empowering Left-Behind Minority Communities’ project will enable these communities to find opportunities, use their voices, claim their rights and be involved in the development process of Bangladesh.

 
Read more
This programme qualifies for matched giving by the EU in a ratio of 5:1. This means that £5,000 provided by Poverty and Hope will release a total of £30,000 of funding for this work. Among these minorities are the Dalits, who occupy the bottom of the caste hierarchy in Bangladesh and face multiple forms of violence and discrimination.

The average annual income in Bangladesh is around US$2,200. However, the income for a Dalit can be as little as a tenth of the national average. Dalit women and girls often face further discrimination as the communities are patriarchal with deeply conservative values about gender roles that severely restrict their rights and freedoms. Through four local partners Christian Aid is working to provide help.

Activities include ensuring the rights of participation of the poor and marginalised in the decision-making processes that affect their lives and providing access to legal aid to women, men and children living in poverty or facing disadvantage or discrimination

Download a full project information leaflet

 



Hidden voices of the Favelas (CMS)
 

Inequalities in Brazil are among the worst in the world. Florianopolis, in the south, has many favelas (slums), which are controlled by drugs and gangs and house much of the city’s population. Through CMS supported individuals - Andy and  Kati -  this project is about engaging subcultures on the fringes including impoverished migrant communities and people that get caught in the cycle of crime just to survive.

 
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Partnerships with CMS are based on supporting individuals, who in Florianapolis, Brazil are Andy and Kati Walsh. Inequalities in Brazil are among the worst in the world. Florianopolis, in the south, has many favelas (slums), which are controlled by drugs and gangs and house much of the city’s population. Brazil is also home to some of the world’s most dangerous prisons.

Andy is a dual British/Argentine citizen fluent in Portuguese, and Kati is from Brazil, so Latin America has always been part of their lives and close to their hearts. They describe their mission as follows: “We know this city well and that it is home to unreached and diverse marginalised communities. Over time, we will concentrate on engaging subcultures on the fringes including impoverished migrant communities and people that get caught in the cycle of crime just to survive.

It is to these subcultures and “hidden voices”, where the Church struggles to be, that we feel called by God.” They see their role as working with churches and NGOs towards social justice for the excluded and marginalised, to help them find life-changing hope in Jesus.
 
 

 

Myanmar Education Programme (USPG)
 

Seventy per cent of Myanmar’s population lives in rural areas. In remote places, children and young people often have to travel in small boats and walk or cycle for hours to reach schools or live in boarding houses away from their families. The programme aims to raise the standard of teaching, increase school attendance, and strengthen Church and community leadership in education.

 
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There is also a shortage of teachers in these areas, and they can lack the skills necessary to teach certain subjects through having limited access to training. In addition, economic hardship, classroom overcrowding, and traditional rote-based instruction have seen children from weaker academic and socio-economic backgrounds slip behind and drop out. 

One in 5 children aged 6 to 10 years of age do not attend primary school. The Church of the Province of Myanmar (CPM) is a well-respected agency within the country and has already had substantial success running a Community Health Programme in rural areas. CPM are currently focussed on improving children’s education with a new programme started in 2020, in partnership with USPG.

The programme aims to raise the standard of teaching, increase school attendance, and strengthen Church and community leadership in education. It will do this by funding teacher training, the provision of basic learning aids like blackboards, plus nutritious meals and the payment of tuition fees for the poorest students.

The programme will directly support 600 girls and 600 boys at 13 primary schools and nine secondary schools, seven of which are boarding schools.

Download a full project information leaflet

 



Tanzania Clean Water Provision
 


The Dioceses of Mpwapwa and Kondoa are located in the central part of Tanzania - a challenging but beautiful environment of mountains and semi-arid plains. Most people live as subsistence farmers. Donations received through this year’s Poverty & Hope Appeal will enable the Dioceses of Mpwapwa and Kondoa to empower rural communities with water harvesting projects, irrigation systems and safe drinking water.
 

Read more
Villagers freely give their labour for water projects, but most communities can’t afford to: hire a bulldozer to build a sand dam for water harvesting; buy guttering and water butts to capture and store rain water; or buy piping and pumps to supply water for micro irrigation of agricultural projects; let alone simple filters to remove harmful bacteria (such as cholera and typhoid), parasites and silt.

Small changes – huge impact! While drought-resistant crops are being introduced alongside traditional crops of sunflower, maize and groundnut, millet, sorghum, tomatoes, onions and green vegetables and fruit trees, water is still needed to irrigate the land to ensure a harvest that will feed families, provide seed for planting, and have surplus to sell.

In Kondoa one option being given consideration is to fund a water supply in Kidoka, in the south of the Diocese and on the main north/south road running through it.

Potentially this would not just provide water for the community, but also be the basis for establishing a demonstration agricultural plot that will be used for study trips for people from other parishes, so that they can expand their understanding of what can be done, learn about different farming techniques and also about how to grow, market and sell cash crops.

 

 



Self Supporting Communities, Zimbabwe
 



Harare Diocese is a mix of urban and linked rural parishes and Poverty and Hope funding will be directed towards projects and activities that will help the rural parishes to be less dependent on support from the city.
 

Read more

As in Tanzania, clean water and irrigation systems are important, but in the Zimbabwean rural communities there is also a keen interest in small diversification projects which can provide both food and income. Fish-farming is seen as a good way of improving food supplies for villagers, and some clergy have been involved in pioneering this.

Bee-keeping is also viewed as a way in which quite small investments can produce rapid and significant returns in honey production and is being strongly encouraged within the diocese. 

 

How to make a donation

We know that the pandemic has greatly affected many members of our communities and that you yourself may be struggling. However, if you are able to do so, please support the Poverty and Hope Appeal in whatever way you can.

As well as DONATING ONLINE  you can also:

E-banking: You can make a donation by e-banking to the following account: Rochester Diocesan Society and Board of Finance, sort code 20-54-29, account 90760099. In the reference box, please put P&H so we can correctly allocate the money to the Poverty and Hope Appeal, and something to identify your church (or nothing if you wish your donation to be given anonymously). 

Send a cheque: please make out to ‘Rochester DBF’ with ‘Poverty and Hope Appeal’ on the back and send them with any completed gift aid envelopes to Finance Team Rochester Diocese, St Nicholas Church, Boley Hill, Rochester ME1 1SL.

Add giftaid: You may increase the value of your giving by gift-aiding your donation. This allows us to reclaim the tax relating to your gift. Please download and fill in this form and return it with your donation to the Rochester Finance Team at: Finance Team Rochester Diocese, St Nicholas Church, Boley Hill, Rochester ME1 1SL.

 

Spread the word

We would love your help in spreading the word about the Appeal in your communities and to encourage as many donations as possible: 


Why not invite someone to come and talk about Poverty and Hope in your church. Please email Peter Kettle, Poverty and Hope Coordinator, on: povertyandhope@gmail.com or call 01474 813 632.

 


Key Contacts

Peter Kettle

Poverty and Hope Appeal Coordinator

Get in touch